A refugee from the oil spill in Calhoun County found its way to Branch County, and was spotted near Matteson Lake Road on Wednesday by MJ Vickers of Bronson. Vickers was able to get a photograph of the swan, and  his wife, Lisa Vickers, called the Enbridge hotline to report the find.

A refugee from the oil spill in Calhoun County found its way to Branch County and was spotted near Matteson Lake Road on Wednesday by MJ Vickers of Bronson.


Vickers was able to get a photograph of the swan, and  his wife, Lisa Vickers, called the Enbridge hotline to report the find.


The hotline number is 800-306-6837.


Enbridge Inc., is the company responsible for the spill.


At that number, Kim Morris acknowledged the call and said the information had been forwarded to the proper persons to dispatch a unit down to find the swan.


Morris said there have not been other calls thus far, regarding animals covered with oil coming down over the county line.


Valdo Calvert of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), which has been working with Enbridge, Binder Park Zoo and others in the wildlife reclamation and rehabilitation effort, said the public is strongly discouraged from trying to help or handle oil-laden animals, as inexperienced people put themselves at risk, and the animals at further risk.


In other matters, as the spill relates to Branch County, Jim Coury, of the Kalamazoo River Watershed Council, affirmed what state Rep. Ken Kurtz was told at a meeting of Lansing legislators with Enbridge and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) last week regarding any danger to Branch County.


Coury spoke to the matter after the big community meeting event held Monday night at the Marshall High School.


He said the Kalamazoo Watershed does not reach into Branch county and there was no danger to groundwater over the county line.


Rick Pierson of the Calhoun County Conservation District explained that while the St. Joseph River drainage basin, is in Branch County, is adjacent to the Kalamazoo watershed, there is a ridge between the two, preventing drainage from either into the respective areas.


Coury also affirmed what Kurtz was told about the heavy clay soil also prohibiting flowage.


In a related area, an Enbridge flyer was made available to the pubic after the meeting Monday night, indicating jobs available.


It said a trade union hotline is in place to field inquiries about possible employment opportunities related to the Enbridge “containment and cleanup operations.”


The number was given and verified as 888-489-3753.


Enbridge has reported over 1,000 employees and contractors dealing with the disaster.


The Daily Reporter